Patient Engagement

Brief interventions ineffective for reducing unhealthy drug use August 21, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
The United States has invested substantially in screening and brief intervention for illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse, based in part on evidence of efficacy for unhealthy alcohol use. However, it is not a recommended universal preventive service in primary care, according to a recently published study.
Use of a lower intensity bone marrow transplantation method showed promising results among 30 patients (16-65 years of age) with severe sickle cell disease, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA.
In a study that included nearly 65,000 older patients hospitalized with pneumonia, treatment that included azithromycin compared with other antibiotics was associated with a significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA.
Study finds large increase in type 1 and 2 diabetes among U.S. youth May 12, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
In a study that included data from more than three million children and adolescents from diverse geographic regions of the United States, researchers found that the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes increased significantly between 2001 and 2009, according to the study in the May 7 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health.
New blood pressure guideline suggests millions no longer need hypertension medication April 22, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
doctor taking patient blood pressure
Applying the updated 2014 blood pressure guideline to the U.S. population suggests that nearly 6 million adults are no longer classified as needing hypertension medication, and that an estimated 13.5 million adults would now be considered as having achieved goal blood pressure, primarily older adults, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions.
Mammogram screening should be based on patients' age, risk level and individual preferences April 07, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
women waiting for mamogram
About 40,000 women die each year of breast cancer in the United States. Mammography screening is one way to detect breast cancer early. However, mammograms have benefits and harms. A review of existing medical studies and trials suggests that mammography screening decisions should be individualized to each patient based on age, risk levels and preferences, according to a study appearing in the April 2 JAMA. Catherine Dolf has more in this JAMA Report video.
Pattern of higher blood pressure in early adulthood helps predict risk of atherosclerosis February 17, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Pattern of higher blood pressure in early adulthood helps predict risk of atherosclerosis
In an analysis of blood pressure patterns over a 25-year span from young adulthood to middle age, individuals who exhibited elevated and increasing blood pressure levels throughout this time period had greater odds of having higher measures of coronary artery calcification, according to a study in the Feb. 5 issue of JAMA.
Wide variation found in evidence used by FDA for approval of new drugs January 27, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
quality of new drugs
Clinical trials used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve new drugs between 2005 and 2012 vary widely in their characteristics, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA.
Greater density of coronary artery calcium associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease January 20, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Michael H. Criqui, MD, MPH, of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues determined the independent associations of coronary artery calcium (CAC) volume and CAC density with cardiovascular disease events.
Use of vitamin E by patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease slows functional decline January 03, 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Among patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease, a daily dosage of 2,000 IUs of vitamin E, compared to placebo, was effective in slowing functional decline and in reducing caregiver time in assisting patients, according to a study appearing in the January 1 issue of JAMA.
Rebecca Coelius, MD, of ONC at mHealth Summit 2013 December 23, 2013 | HIMSS Media
Rebecca Coelius, MD
Rebecca Coelius, MD, ONC's Medical Officer for Innovations, explains how the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT defines innovation and is driving advancements in areas such as Blue Button and standards of interoperability.
Yearly flu vaccine may offer additional benefits for patients with heart disease November 04, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
Yearly flu vaccine may offer additional benefits for patients with heart disease
Receiving an influenza vaccination was associated with a lower risk of major adverse cardiovascular events such as heart failure or hospitalization for heart attack, with the greatest treatment effect seen among patients with recent acute coronary syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 23/30 issue of JAMA.
hormones for chronic disease prevention
Extended follow-up of the two Women's Health Initiative hormone therapy trials does not support use of hormones for chronic disease prevention, although the treatment may be appropriate for menopausal symptom management in some women, according to a study in the Oct. 2 issue of JAMA.
Repeat bone mineral density tests did not predict future fracture risk September 30, 2013 | Journal of the American Medical Association
bone mineral density tests
A second bone mineral density (BMD) screening four years after a baseline measurement provided little additional value when assessing risk for hip or other major osteoporotic fracture among older men and women untreated for osteoporosis, and resulted in little change in risk classification used in clinical management, findings that question the common clinical practice of repeating a BMD test every two years, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of JAMA.
Chronic care management program does not result in increased abstinence from alcohol and other drug dependence
Persons with alcohol and other drug dependence who received chronic care management, including relapse prevention counseling and medical, addiction and psychiatric treatment, were no more abstinent than those who received usual primary care, according to a study in the September 18 issue of JAMA.