Physicians crown ACA with dunce cap

Healthcare reformation efforts have done little to cauterize a hemorrhaging system, physicians responding to a recent Medicus Firm survey declared, delivering downright dismal marks to various aspects of Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation.

The report, known as Physician Practice Preference and Relocation Survey, is the tenth of its kind to challenge approximately 2,500 physicians from various practice/clinical settings to reveal their grades for industry progress. As in years past, ACA was up in 2013 for prime evaluation; its current score would have even the most troubled student backpacking it in.

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In four out of five categories, physicians flunked ACA legislation. With respect the perceived overall effectiveness of the measure, a majority of the respondents also delivered the dunce cap.

All information courtesy of The Medicus Firm. Presentation by PhysBizTech.

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When prompted to explain their grade, most physicians believed that ACA did not serve to stifle rising healthcare costs nor did they see it as effective in ensuring quality and efficiency. Doctors did, on the other hand, see healthcare reform as marginally successful in increasing access to healthcare (grades were evenly distributed for this section between B and C, although F was the third highest response).

"Since we initially began surveying physicians on this issue in 2009, they have expressed many concerns about the government's answer to health reform, the [ACA]. Most physicians seem to agree there is a serious need for the improvements in cost control, access, and quality of care, but the general consensus is that a large, sweeping, bureaucratic government intervention is not the way to improve the nation's healthcare system," said Jim Stone, president of The Medicus Firm, in a prepared statement.

Generally, Stone noted that physicians remain as worried as ever about how reform will alter the doctor-patient relationship and continue to possibly divert provider agency.

"Physicians feel that the ACA has caused them to lose what little control they had left over how healthcare is provided, and that is not in the best interest of the patient, many physicians believe," he concluded.

Find more information about the survey here.

Photo used with permission from Shutterstock.com

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